Author Archives: SABA

Join SABA for Tour De Hops!

Celebrate NAHBS 15th Year Anniversary at Tour De Hops!

Join us for an evening of bicycles, craft beer, local wine, and great company! SABA is proud to host the official North American Handmade Bicycle Show’s 15th Year Anniversary Party with Tour De Hops!

We’re excited to bring together visitors in town for NAHBS and members of our local bicycle community for this casual party benefiting SABA and Cycles 4 Hope. Tour De Hops will feature a townie bicycle ride and vintage bicycle exhibit at College Cyclery in Curtis Park, music, a raffle, special NAHBS edition beer made by Bike Dog Brewing, and 30+ taps to explore at Capital Hop Shop, right around the corner from the Sacramento Convention Center.

Proceeds from the party go towards SABA’s work to improve our region’s quality of life by advocating for people on bikes and as well as NAHBS’ local charitable partner Cycles 4 Hope, which works to serve people-in-need through the donation of recycled bicycles.

Tickets are $5. Raffle tickets and drinks will be available for purchase at the event. Buy your ticket today!

Announcement: SABA Leadership

The Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates (SABA) Board of Directors would like to thank Jim Brown, Executive Director of SABA since November 2012, for his service and contributions to the Sacramento area bicycling community. Jim leaves behind an impressive legacy of accomplishments during his time with the organization including aiding in the creation of an updated Bicycle Master Plan in the City of Sacramento, doubling SABA’s operational budget over the course of 6 years, managing our many Safe Routes to Schools programs, among many other achievements. We wish him the best in his future endeavors.

We are pleased to welcome Debra Banks as SABA’s Interim Executive Director. She is the owner of Rivet Cycle Works, a boutique bicycle leather saddle and accessory company, and is an avid randonneur. Debra began her involvement with SABA as a member of the Board of Directors. In 2018, she was hired as SABA’s Operations Director to oversee the organization’s contracts and financial matters. Debra is well-positioned to lead SABA’s programs and activities in this transitional period as the Board of Directors works towards a permanent leadership role.

We are excited for another busy year in bicycle advocacy this 2019, and we hope to continue to have your support. Stay tuned for more updates about SABA’s leadership, events, and activities!

Asha Kreiling

President, SABA

Join our management team

Join the team that is helping make bicycling a clean, sustainable transportation choice for more people in our region. We’re hiring for two positions on our management team.

Bike Valet Manager

Councilmember Eric Guerra (center) and SABA volunteers at the Tahoe Park Food Truck Mania

We’re looking for a highly organized, detail-oriented perfectionist who loves going the extra mile to deliver high-quality service to customers and clients and help SABA raise its profile in the community. Bike Valet turns community events into bikeable destinations. In 2018 we parked more than 10,000 bikes at more than 250 community events. Our clients include the Sacramento Kings, Sacramento Republic FC, SactoMoFo, Downtown Sacramento Partnership, and Midtown Association. This is our most visible program! Read more about Bike Valet here.

You’ll manage, train and support the SABA team that delivers Bike Valet services, manage contracts for services, and work closely with clients to ensure that bike parking is handled efficiently for everyone. You’ll be a great fit if you love what bikes do for the world, have program, event or retail management or supervisory experience, and have excellent organizational and communication skills.

This is a half-time position (20 hours average) with variable hours, including occasional early mornings and late evenings. Pay: $18 per hour.

Click here to download complete job description.

Bike Doc Manager (seasonal)

We’re hiring a manager for Bike Doc, a program we manage for North Natomas Jibe that provides maintenance checks and basic repairs at more than 24 community events per year in North Natomas. This year our team of mechanics checked and repaired 675 bikes between April and October.

You’ll manage all details of our contract with North Natomas Jibe, train and supervise SABA’s team of 8-12 mechanics, promptly complete reports about repair activities, and maintain an inventory of supplies and materials. You’ll also work as a mechanic at each event, where you’ll supervise all mechanic services.

You’ll be a good fit if you really know and love bikes, have professional bike mechanic experience, are highly organized, and work well as a team leader.

This is a seasonal position from Feb. 1, 2019 through Oct. 31, 2019. Hours vary from 6 to 12 hours per week, depending on the Bike Doc schedule, with the busiest periods in April to June and September through October. Pay: $18 per hour.

Click here to download complete job description.

To learn more about both positions and about working for SABA, contact Debra Banks at deb@sacbike.org.

 

SABA’s year in review

What a year! In the face of grim news about our warming atmosphere and changing climate, we saw a lot of new bicycle infrastructure installed in our region, and more public funding to make even more progress.  SABA’s work on behalf of clean, healthful, sustainable transportation has never been more important. Read more below about some of our most important accomplishments from 2018.

But first, if you value this work, please consider showing your support with a tax-deductible, year-end gift. Click here to give online using your credit or bank card or directly from your bank account. Thank you!

Advocacy

Bike share

Photo by Lezlie Sterling/ Sacbee

When the regional bike share system launched this spring, we worked with the Sacramento Area Council of Governments , the agency that manages the regional bike share program, to help introduce the system, especially to underserved neighborhoods.

Meanwhile, we are part of a steering committee to advise on a possible bike share system in Rancho Cordova and Folsom. We continue to be a strong champion of bike share as a way to replace short car trips with bike trips.

Protected bikeways

Protected bikeway on J Street in Midtown Sacramento.

Since this spring, the City of Sacramento has installed the city’s first protected bikeways on 9th, 10th, J, P and Q streets in downtown Sacramento.

Meanwhile, the City of West Sacramento is completing its second protected bikeway project, near 5th Street and Tower Bridge Gateway, and planning protected bikeways and buffered bike lanes along West Capitol Ave. And the City of Rancho Cordova continues work toward installing its first protected bikeway on Routier Road and Rod Beaudry Drive.

We continue to be strong advocates for protected bikeways as the way to make busy streets function more safely and comfortably for a wider variety of bicyclists, especially those who are the most reluctant to ride directly next to vehicle traffic. Read more here.

Connecting the Grid

Narrow conditions on 16th Street leave no space for bike lanes.

Even as the City of Sacramento continues to install protected bikeways in the downtown Grid, notable disconnects persist at freeway ramps along the south and east edges of the Grid, in the part of downtown north of P St. and west of 16th St., and north of downtown to the American River.

In January, when Sacramento County closed the Jibboom Street Bridge for a 6-month-long rehab project, we generated some media attention to the need for more bridges across the American River. And this spring we went directly to the community and heard strong demand for much better access for bikes on N. 16th Street.

Off-street paths

We’ve been actively involved with generating public support for new off-street multi-use biking and walking paths, including the Mather Heritage Trail in Rancho Cordova, the Sycamore Trail in West Sacramento, the Dry Creek Greenway West in Roseville and the Sacramento River Parkway, Del Rio Trail and the Two Rivers Trail in Sacramento.

Our efforts include providing technical assistance where needed, and also advising elected officials, residents and prospective users about the ways that multi-use paths enable healthy activity, provide safe, car-free routes for bicycling, and activate isolated areas.

Cross section of the Two Rivers Trail

No on Prop 6

Prop. 6 on the Nov. 2020 ballot would have repealed the gas tax increase enacted last year in California and made it nearly impossible to enact future increases. As of this fall, new gas tax revenues had increased the City of Sacramento’s transportation budget by 50%. Prop. 6 would have been disastrous for our region and the state by eliminating this funding. We joined hundreds of organizations, businesses, professional associations and local government agencies throughout California to defeat Prop. 6. California voters rejected the measure by 57% to 43%.

Countywide transportation funding

The Sacramento region spends too little on transportation. Regionally, our spending is lower than comparable metropolitan areas elsewhere in California. That’s partly the result of not having enough locally controlled funding for transportation improvements. In most of our region, most transportation funding comes from competitive grants, which require local matching funds. Without a sufficient pool of locally controlled funds, we can’t generate much match funding, which limits the number and size of grants we pursue, and we also don’t have the capacity to make improvements quickly outside of grant cycles.

This summer we began working with our closest allies – including WALKSacramento, Environmental Council of Sacramento, Breathe California Sacramento Region and Sacramento Housing Alliance – on a strategy to fight for a community-driven process for producing the next countywide transportation sales tax measure, which would increase the amount of locally controlled funding for transportation. Measure B failed to win passage in 2016 in part because it was simply a shopping list, without clear goals that reflected what community needs from its transportation system. With Sacramento County planning to put another transportation sales tax measure before voters in 2020, we want to make sure it fully understands what the community expects from the measure.

Read more about our advocacy work.

Community Cycling Program

Education

Bike skills training at Southport Elementary School in West Sacramento.

This year we held our first-ever cycling skills classes, including 11 in West Sacramento so far — and we’re planning for more next year, including classes in Sacramento.

Through the City of West Sacramento’s Safe Routes to School program, we also delivered cycling skills instruction at four elementary schools in West Sacramento and we’ve begun offering it at three more during the current school year.

Bike Valet

We provided valet bike parking for more than 10,000 bikes at some 250 community events, enabling thousands of people to bike to community events instead of drive. Those bike trips replaced car trips that would have pumped nearly 10 tons of carbon pollutants into the atmosphere and our lungs. Read more here.

Bike repairs

We performed safety checks and minor repairs on 675 bikes in North Natomas and on dozens of bikes in South Sacramento and Rancho Cordova neighborhoods that don’t have retail bike shops.

Read more about our Community Cycling Program.

Join today for a chance to win

Protected bikeway on P Street in downtown Sacramento

We’re looking for at least 100 new monthly members who love what bicycling does for our community.

Could one of them be you?

We’ve just introduced a new monthly membership option that makes it easy and affordable to support our mission and our work.

For as little as $5 a month — less than the price of a Starbucks® pumpkin spice latte or a pint of your favorite local IPA — you can help us continue advocating for the region-wide benefits of bicycle transportation, including cleaner air, safer streets and calmer neighborhoods for everyone.

Join today as a new monthly member and you could win one of our weekly drawing prizes, including a gift card from Natomas Bike Shop, Sutterville Bicycle Company, Magpie Cafe or Rivet Cycle Works, or a 1-month guest membership to the Capital Athletic Club.

You’ll also be entered in our grand prize drawing to win this PUBLIC Dutch-style, single-speed step-thru (medium/large frame), courtesy of Mike’s Bikes.

Joining today is simple: Click on the link below and select the monthly donation amount that feels right for you. You can make your membership donation using your credit or bank card or by direct transfer from your bank account.

> > >  JOIN NOW < < < 

Click here to learn more about the work you’re supporting and the other benefits of membership.

Questions? Contact us at saba@sacbike.org or 916-444-6600

Big thanks to Natomas Bike Shop, Sutterville Bicycle Company, Magpie CafeRivet Cycle Works, Capital Athletic Club. and Mike’s Bikes for generously supporting our membership drive!

Who pays for rough roads? You do.

Roads in need of repair cost California drivers $61 billion (yes, billion) every year in the form of additional vehicle operating costs, the cost of lost time and wasted fuel due to congestion, and the financial cost of traffic crashes, according to a report released this month by a national transportation research organization.

Here are five reasons why the condition of our roads matters for people on bikes:

– People on bikes are hurt in crashes caused by hitting or dodging potholes and broken pavement.

– People on bikes are hurt and killed in collisions with drivers who hit or try to dodge potholes and broken pavement.

– Rough roads discourage people from traveling by bike instead of driving, and that keeps too many cars on the road.

– People on bikes, like all other Californians, suffer the health effects of breathing air polluted by traffic congestion resulting from poor road conditions.

– Most people on bikes also drive cars.

Road maintenance is essential to providing safe conditions for bicycle transportation. We need adequate funding to keep our roads in good repair.

Last year California enacted the first increase in the state gas tax in a generation, with the goal of funding a backlog of roadway repairs and other improvements. Click here to read more about this new revenue source, including the local roadway projects being implemented throughout the state with this funding.

Protected bikeway on J Street at 21st Street in Midtown Sacramento

The protected bikeway on J Street in Midtown Sacramento, the 2 miles of buffered bike lanes being installed on Mack Road, and the proposed Two Rivers Trail in the American River Parkway near East Sacramento are prominent local projects funded with the new gas tax revenues.

A November 2018 ballot measure called Proposition 6, whose largest donors are 7 Republican congressional and gubernatorial campaigns, seeks to repeal the funding. SABA is part of the coalition of 300+ organizations, businesses and public agencies united against Prop. 6. Please consider joining the No on Prop. 6 coalition and also encouraging those in your network to do the same.

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If you value this kind of information and SABA’s work in our region, please consider becoming a SABA member.

Improving Mack Road (a little)

The central city isn’t the only part of the city getting some bike love as the result of ongoing road resurfacing projects.

While bicyclists get used to new buffered bike lanes on 24th Street and Elvas Ave. and a new protected bikeway on J Street, this week City of Sacramento crews started work to resurface 2 miles of Mack Road between Valley Hi Dr. and the Morrison Creek bridge just west of Deer Creek Dr.

When the roadway striping is eventually repainted, the existing bike lane will be enhanced with a 2-foot painted buffer, like the new lanes recently installed on 24th Street and Elvas Ave. near downtown. The space for the buffer comes from narrowing the existing traffic lanes, which are more than 20 feet wide in places (the City’s minimum standard for the width of a striped traffic lane is 11 feet).

As with the recent bikeway improvements installed in Midtown, Curtis Park, Oak Park and East Sacramento, this project is funded with state gas tax revenues specifically earmarked for road rehabilitation projects. The City has a policy of installing planned bikeway improvements whenever a street is resurfaced. With striping already included in the resurfacing budget, adding bike lanes costs almost nothing.

Buffered bike lanes on 24th St. between 2nd Ave. and Broadway

The new buffered lane will add some lateral space between bikes and moving vehicles, making Mack Rd. a little more comfortable for bicycling. Accommodating bikes on Mack Road is important because it’s the only continuous east-west street for more than a mile to the north and south and it’s the area’s main destination for shopping as well as service jobs.

Will the new bike lanes solve the problems bicyclists experience on Mack? It will help slow down traffic, which is the main factor in fatal collisions throughout the city – even drivers will benefit from this project.  But the speed limit on most of Mack Road is 45 MPH, a speed at which nearly every collision involving a bicyclist or pedestrian is fatal.  A year ago a cyclist died in a collision on Mack Road at Summersdale Dr.

Speeding is a major problem on Mack Road. Like most of the main roads in the South Area, Mack Road has very long blocks between signalized intersections — more than a half-mile between the signals at Valley Hi Drive and Center Parkway and nearly three-quarters of a mile between the signals at Deer Creek Dr. and Brookfield Dr. at the west end of the project area. Long distances between signals and very wide traffic lanes make it easy and inviting to drive considerably faster than 45 MPH.

There are several alternatives to installing this type of bike lane that come with big caveats. A protected bikeway could provide a little more separation between bikes and cars, however, this kind of facility isn’t recommended for a street that has the number of driveways seen along Mack Rd. Plus, there is no curbside parking anywhere along Mack Road, so creating true physical separation would require installing a median, which is far beyond the City’s budget for a road resurfacing project.

A completely separated, off-street bike path might be the safest solution for a street this busy. Installing one would require the City to buy the necessary right-of-way on both sides of the street for at least 2 miles. That assumes that owners were willing to sell and the City could afford to buy, not including the cost of construction.

A cheaper and safer solution might be to look for an alternate route that parallels Mack, however, the nearest continuous east-west streets are Florin Rd. more than a mile to the north and Cosumnes River Boulevard about 1.5 miles to the south. The lack of continuous east-west streets other than these major arterial boulevards is a significant obstacle to improving mobility and safety for bicyclists throughout the South Area.

For now, enhancing the existing bike lanes on Mack Road is a worthy first step, recognizing that making arterial boulevards accessible for bicycling remains a huge, complicated and necessary challenge.

If you value this kind of information and SABA’s work in our region, please consider becoming a SABA member.

Bike Month After Party is May 31

Help us celebrate our region’s annual celebration of all things bicycle

Close out May is Bike Month 2018 at this happy hour party at SacYard Community Tap House in East Sacramento.

Enjoy a beer on us (choose from 24 taps), live music, great company and a pretty great raffle (see below). All proceeds support SABA’s mission to improve our region’s quality of life by advocating for people on bikes.

WHEN: Thursday, May 31, 2018, 5 to 7 PM

WHERE: SacYard Community Tap House, 1725 33rd St. between P St. and Stockton Blvd.

LIVE MUSIC: South Sac Jooks

FOOD: Available for purchase from Drewski’s and SacYard (includes vegan options)

TICKETS

$20 – A la carte: Individual admission. Includes 1 beer token good for any craft brew on tap

$30 – Main + side: Individual admission + your choice of SABA socks OR SABA Silipint silicone pint (white or black) OR SABA Klean Kanteen stainless steel pint

$40 – Combination platter: Individual admission + SABA socks + SABA beer pint (Silipint OR Klean Kanteen stainless pint)

Click here to purchase tickets.

SPONSORS

Titanium
Bay Area Bicycle Law

Carbon Fiber
Councilmember Jeff Harris
Councilmember Angelique Ashby
Sutter Health Valley Area

Steel
Vice Mayor Steve Hansen
Redfin Real Estate

In-kind
Deb Banks and Rivet Cycle Works
Jackie Musick and the Geared Up Bicycle Technology Program, Cooley Middle School, Roseville
Stace Cooper and Misfit Metals
Edible Pedal Bike Shop

Interested in being a sponsor? Click here to learn more.

Make your sponsor payment via PayPal:
Titanium$1,000
Carbon Fiber$500
Steel$250

Raffle

  • Vintage cruiser donated by Deb Banks/Rivet Cycle Works and restored by students at the Geared Up Bicycle Technology Program at Cooley Middle School in Roseville, with custom artwork by Stace Cooper/Misfit Metals and accessories by Rivet Cycle Works and Edible Pedal.
  • Gift basket from Chocolate Fish Coffee
  • 2 all-day e-bike rentals from Practical Cycle
  • $100 gift card plus thermal flask from Magpie Cafe
  • Dinner for 4 + RiverCats tickets in the Western Health Advantage VIP suite at Raley Field

Cooley Middle School students with the restored cruiser.

Before landing in Sacramento, this beauty spent 30 years in a garage in Aspen, Colorado, where it was rolled out once a year to be ridden in the local 4th of July parade.

  • Students in the Geared Up Bicycle Technology Program at Cooley Middle School in Roseville rebuilt and repainted the bike and added accessories from Rivet Cycle Works. Click here to read more about the program.

    Local artist Stace Cooper, owner of Misfit Metals, created one-of-a-kind badges for the tank.

Calgary goes big, with big results

As the City of Sacramento prepares the Downtown Specific Plan, which will provide high-level environmental review for projects to add at least 10,000 housing units in the Central City over the next 10 years, this is the first in a series of blog posts examining how other cities are dramatically improving bicycle transportation and roadway safety in urban neighborhoods.

Like Sacramento, the city of Calgary, Alberta on the Canadian prairie is shedding its image as a Cowtown. The city is denser than Sacramento, with a population nearly three times bigger. But with its flat landscape, a river running along one edge, a regular street grid and a railroad mainline running across the middle, downtown Calgary looks a whole lot like downtown Sacramento.

In the summer of 2015, Calgary – which already had one 7-block-long downtown cycle track (also known as a protected bike lane or separated bikeway) — took the unprecedented step of adding an entire network of cycle tracks in a single big project (green dotted lines on the map below). The longest, the 12th Ave cycle track, runs for about 1.3 miles, roughly the distance between 5th St. and 22nd St. in downtown Sacramento.

The Calgary City Council approved the network as a pilot project and 18 months later voted to make it permanent. The experiment paid off spectacularly. Three months after the network opened, bike traffic had increased by 95% on the streets with cycle tracks compared to year earlier. Overall, the project increased bicycle traffic into downtown Calgary by 40% in just about a year, including a larger share of women traveling by bike. Better still, the project came in more than $1 million under budget.

 

 

There are big differences between downtown Calgary and Sacramento, besides the weather. For one thing, downtown Calgary has wider streets than downtown Sacramento, which provides more space for bicycle improvements such as cycle tracks. Nevertheless, the Calgary experiment holds these lessons for Sacramento:

First, it shows that building an entire network all at once produces big results, very quickly. While the ridership increases seen in Calgary are fairly typical of cycle tracks installed in other cities, the impact is magnified when it involves multiple streets in a network, rather than a single street. Sacramento’s Bicycle Master Plan calls for increasing the rate of bike commuting to 7% of all commute trips by 2020, more than triple Sacramento’s current bike commuting rate of just under 2%. Nothing short of this kind of network will get us to that goal with less than three years to go.

Second, it shows that travel by bike works best when bike routes are continuous. This isn’t news to anyone who uses a bike for everyday transportation, but it’s yet another argument for continuous routes rather than the piecemeal, disconnected improvements we’re accustomed to seeing. Sacramento’s Bicycle Master Plan sets the goal of creating continuous “low-traffic-stress” bike routes throughout the city. Cycle tracks are designed to provide low-stress conditions on the busiest downtown streets and Calgary shows us how well that can work.

Third, it shows that a willingness to experiment can pay off. Experiments aren’t automatically more complicated technically, but they require courage, creativity and openmindedness at City Hall, as well as the ability (and will) to make the right investments. Creating that culture of experimentation may be the biggest challenge for a city like Sacramento.

As Sacramento plans for a future with a lot more downtown residents living in denser neighborhoods, bicycling (and walking and public transit use) will become a better, faster, cheaper way to make short trips – but only if the vision is bold and the commitment is big.

Read more about Calgary’s downtown cycle track project.

Take a ride through the downtown Calgary cycle tracks with Tom Babin, author of the Canadian bike blog, Shifter

Velo Ball is Thursday, Oct 5

Mark your calendar for the season’s best bike event: Velo Ball is Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017, at the California State Railroad Museum.

Velo Ball is SABA’s annual fundraising gala and a celebration of the all things bicycle and the community of people who are helping create a cleaner, healthier, friendlier region for everyone through bicycling.

Auction: 3 nights in Mendocino for 6+ people

Surrounded by historic train equipment in the museum’s spectacular Roundhouse, Velo Ball guests will enjoy great local food from the Yisrael Family Farm, Post Oak BBQ and a Thai pop-up by chefs Adam Pechal and Chris Fairman. Local drinks are from Bike Dog Brewing in West Sacramento, Two Rivers CiderMichael David Winery in Lodi and Burly Beverages. Plus there’s music and dancing, and an auction of bike accessories, artworks, locally made treasures and unique experiences. Check out these incredible vacations to Lake Tahoe, Costa Rica and Bali!

Chef Adam Pechal

Chanowk Yisrael

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And this year Velo Ball will be the closing party for the California Bicycle Summit — celebrate along with some 150 advocates from throughout California. We’re excited to work with Unseen Heroes to create a memorable evening for everyone.

TICKETS

Tickets start at $25 each, with special packages for beer lovers, couples and groups of 8. Click here to buy now.

As we gather bikes, vacation packages and uniquely Sacramentan experiences and treasures for your silent auction,

 

SPONSORS

Many thanks to these generous Velo Ball sponsors:

Silver
California Bicycle Coalition
Sacramento Bicycle Kitchen

Bronze
ICF International Sacramento
Gary Brustin Bicycle Lawyer
University Transportation and Parking Services, Sacramento State
Sacramento County Supervisor Don Nottoli
Sacramento City Councilmember Jay Schenirer

Show the community how your business aligns with our goal of improving the region’s quality of life by becoming a Velo Ball sponsor. Download the sponsor overview or contact us for more information.